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  • Detail of the 1970 painting

    Detail of the 1970 painting "Abstract" by Alma Thomas, born Columbus, GA 1891-Washington, DC 1978. Smithsonian American Art Museum, Gift of the artist.

    Celebrate the Solar Eclipse with Folkways

    There are few things more awe-inspiring than a solar eclipse. For centuries, people across the globe have met these astronomical events with celebration, fear, and wonder. Each element of an eclipse—earth, sun, and moon—has long inspired artists in both imagery and metaphor. This compilation celebrates the 2017 solar eclipse with songwriters, poets, and musicians who provide depth and dimension to each of these celestial wonders. From a folk classic like “House of the Rising Sun” and a jazz standard like “How High the Moon,” to Sarah Webster Fabio’s allegorical “Eclipse” and a playful rendition of Len Chandler’s “Run Come See the Sun” by Pete Seeger, this playlist is sure to serve as an enjoyable accompaniment to any eclipse experience.

    While you listen, feel free to read about solar eclipse folk stories and learn how the Smithsonian is celebrating the 2017 eclipse.

    There are few things more awe-inspiring than a solar eclipse. For centuries, people across the globe have met these astronomical events with celebration, fear, and wonder. Each element of an eclipse—earth, sun, and moon—has long inspired artists in both imagery and metaphor. This compilation celebrates the 2017 solar eclipse with songwriters, poets, and musicians who provide depth and dimension to each of these celestial wonders. From a folk classic like “House of the Rising Sun” and a jazz standard like “How High the Moon,” to Sarah Webster Fabio’s allegorical “Eclipse” and a playful rendition of Len Chandler’s “Run Come See the Sun” by Pete Seeger, this playlist is sure to serve as an enjoyable accompaniment to any eclipse experience.

    While you listen, feel free to read about solar eclipse folk stories and learn how the Smithsonian is celebrating the 2017 eclipse.