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Zen Poems: Read by Lucien Stryk

Zen Poems: Read by Lucien Stryk

“Ox bridle tossed, vows taken, I’m robed and shaven clean. You ask why Bodhidharma came east—Staff thrust out, I hum like mad.” From this poem by Zen master Reito (666-760), Lucien Stryk leads us into an amazing Zen poem journey that spans nearly 1,500 years—from the early Tang Dynasty in China (618-907) to contemporary Japan. A variety of types are presented, including enlightenment poems and death poems of the Chinese Zen masters, poems of the Japanese Zen masters, poems by contemporary Japanese Zen master Shinkichi Takahashi (1901-1987), and by Lucien Stryk (1924— ) himself. Stryk is a widely published Polish-American Zen poet, translator, and former English professor at Northern Illinois University.

Track Listing

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101
Enlightenment Poems of the Chinese Zen Masters Lucien Stryk 6:39
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102
Death Poems of the Chinese Zen Masters Lucien Stryk 8:03
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103
Poems of the Japanese Zen Masters Lucien Stryk 11:58
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201
Poems of the Japanese Zen Masters: Continued Lucien Stryk 8:00
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202
Shinkichi Takahashi - Contemporary Japanese Master Lucien Stryk 6:42
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203
Zen Poems of Lucien Stryk Lucien Stryk 13:45

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